Waste Perspectives from Pakistan Part II: Hameed Gul, a waste picker employed in Islamabad

 

 

 In this three-part series, Solomon Khurrum (previously Director of Operations for Tearfund partner Pak Mission Society) and I share three perspectives on plastic and waste from Pakistan. In part two, we hear how a community recycling centre transformed the life of one family.

Hameed Gul is 45 year old, owns a house and lives at Ali Bakash Town, Islamabad. He has been working with the Integrated Resource Recovery Center (IRRC) for the last three years. He is married with seven children – two sons and five daughters. Both of his sons and one daughter are married. Both sons are working and support him financially. One of his daughters is studying at school.   [Read more…]

Waste Perspectives from Pakistan Part I: Rashid Hameed*, a sanitation worker living in a slum

 

 

This World Environment Day sees a global call to beat plastic pollution. In this three-part series, Solomon Khurrum (previously Director of Operations for Tearfund partner Pak Mission Society) and I share three perspectives on plastic and waste from Pakistan. In part one, we hear what life is like for a sanitation worker living in a slum.

Rashid Hameed is 51 years old and lives in one of Islamabad’s 34 urban slums. Islamabad – Pakistan’s capital city – had an estimated population of 1.74 million in 2009. Over a third of these residents live in illegal slums with no civic facilities.

The slums are mostly inhabited by religious minorities (often Christians) who have migrated from Punjab and other provinces to Islamabad in search of a better future. Mr Hameed migrated with his family from his village to Islamabad in the 1980s. He has lived in the slum with his wife, daughter and three sons ever since.

Rashid shares his experience of life there: [Read more…]

Reasons to be hopeful after Commonwealth funding announcement on plastics

Maria das Gracas

Last year, Maria das Gracas’ house flooded eight times. As I stood with her in her home in a favela in Recife, Brazil, she told me how her community is now sorting and collecting the plastic and waste that clogs the river running through the neighbourhood, improving people’s lives and preventing it getting into the ocean too.

Since Sir David Attenborough and Blue Planet II hit our screens towards the end of last year, many of us have become sensitised to the devastating impact of plastics on our environment. At Tearfund we have become increasingly aware – through our work on the circular economy and our interactions with local communities – that such waste is not just an environmental problem, it is fast becoming a public health crisis for the poorest people.   [Read more…]

Churches push for peace in war-torn South Sudan

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Bishop Arkangelo from the Africa Inland Church speaks on the role of the church in peace building in South Sudan

 

This week the warring parties in South Sudan, together with international community and civil society organisations, will gather at the High Level Revitalization Forum (HLRF) in Addis Ababa to find ways to bring peace and cease hostilities in South Sudan. Ahead of this gathering, Tearfund East Africa Humanitarian Policy Officer, Sini Maria Heikkila, discusses the role of the church in bringing peace.

Conflict has devastated the lives of millions in the world’s newest state since December 2013. More than four million people have been forced to flee their homes. The brunt of the conflict is born by women and children and UNICEF has estimated that 86% of South Sudanese refugees in Uganda are women and children. 

The third meeting of the HLRF in May – the regional peace process led by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development – provides a unique opportunity to achieve an inclusive and lasting peace agreement. In the middle of the conflict, the churches have a key role to play in waging peace and bringing communities together. For instance, Tearfund’s experience shows that generally all churches come together in an ecumenical spirit to promote peace and to work both for development of livelihoods and for spiritual growth. Thus, ensuring that the voice of church is heard in any peace negotiations, including HLRF, remains of utmost importance. [Read more…]

Is the World Bank springing into action on energy access?

Myself with Melanie Robinson and David Kinder, UK representatives to the World Bank

Sharing our new report with Melanie Robinson and David Kinder, UK representatives to the World Bank

 

Last week I joined hundreds of government representatives, business executives and civil society organizations at the World Bank Spring meetings in Washington. I returned home with the overall impression that the World Bank is taking steps in the right direction on climate change. But this action needs to speed up and scale up to meet the Paris Agreement targets and achieve universal energy access by 2030 (Sustainable Development Goal 7). In particular, the Bank needs to phase out fossil fuels more quickly, and increase investment in renewable energy, with a focus on off-grid sources for the poorest populations living in remote communities.

The situation so far

In 2017 the World Bank President announced the phasing out of finance for exploration for oil and gas after 2019; this was an important step forward, but there were few details given at the Spring meetings last week about how this would be implemented. In the meantime, the Bank continues to invest in fossil fuels. [Read more…]

Definitely, maybe: circular economy initiatives that work for poor communities

Over the last 18 months we’ve been thinking, discussing and writing about how the circular economy can work for communities in developing countries. Our latest research paper, Bending the Curve, takes the evidence base to the next stage. It assesses the literature available to identify what works in practice, and the range of income, health and environmental benefits these interventions bring.

We can divide the approaches into three categories, which I think of as:

  • Definitelyproven interventions that have a strong evidence base, and could be replicated in a variety of low- and middle-income contexts.
  • Probably: approaches where the evidence base is evolving; more research is needed to understand how they could be scaled up and rolled out in different contexts.
  • Maybe: areas of high concern or great potential, but where the solutions are as-yet-unproven or speculative.

[Read more…]

7 reasons why Tearfund works with and through the global local church

Worship at a church in Uganda. Photo: Andrew Philip, Tearfund

Worship at a church in Owii, Soroti District, Uganda. Photo: Andrew Philip/Tearfund

 

As a Christian relief and development agency, Tearfund often works with and through the local church. Lucie Woolley, Tearfund Advocacy Learning and Research Officer, explores the distinctive role the church can play in delivering development and humanitarian outcomes globally. 

The church occupies a unique place in the humanitarian and development sector. At its best, it is able to bring a combination of benefits to humanitarian and development work that is found nowhere else.

It is integral in communities, inspirational for their congregations, and influential through its networks at all levels. Using these three concepts as a framework, here are seven good reasons why the global local church is at the heart of Tearfund’s work.  [Read more…]

The tide is turning for the world’s waste crisis

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The Government has woken up to the world’s waste crisis. Uncollected trash blights life chances in poor communities and chokes the oceans. Theresa May’s commitment today to help developing nations tackle pollution and reduce plastic waste through UK aid, as part of the Government’s 25-year environment plan, clears the way to a solution. We hope that concrete announcements will follow soon that commit the Government to spending 3 per cent of their aid budget to tackle this issue.  [Read more…]

Less Coal, Less Gas, More Hope – predictions on UK’s electricity

It’s very encouraging how fast Great Britain’s emissions from electricity have reduced over the last five years – 2017’s figures from the excellent MyGridGB show how far we’ve come.

This is mostly down to 4 things:

  • closing coal power stations
  • replacing a lot of coal with gas
  • replacing some coal with wind, and some with biomass, mainly wood
  • using a bit less electricity
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The future looks good for solar and wind power

Less coal, less gas

We’re doing well on using less coal, the single biggest step Britain needed to take on climate change. I think the government will keep their promise to shut coal power down completely by 2025. It’s been good to see climate minister Claire Perry championing phasing out coal internationally – and her promotion to attend cabinet in the reshuffle is encouraging too. [Read more…]

Tweaking the design of electronic goods could reduce poverty. Here’s how.

In 2016, two hundred printers and monitors were fitted with GPS trackers and dropped at recyclers and charities across the US. After just a few months, one in three had been shipped overseas, mostly across the Pacific to Asia. This experiment by MIT and the Basel Action Network reveals the tip of the electronic waste iceberg: experts estimate that as many as nine out of ten discarded computers eventually end up in developing countries.

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GPS Tracks for the US’ Electronic Waste.  Image: MIT Senseable City Lab, visualisation from the Basel Action Network’s E-Trash Transparency Project

 

These electronics exports can help people escape poverty, but they can also hinder them, and the key lies in product design.  [Read more…]