Is the World Bank springing into action on energy access?

Myself with Melanie Robinson and David Kinder, UK representatives to the World Bank

Sharing our new report with Melanie Robinson and David Kinder, UK representatives to the World Bank

 

Last week I joined hundreds of government representatives, business executives and civil society organizations at the World Bank Spring meetings in Washington. I returned home with the overall impression that the World Bank is taking steps in the right direction on climate change. But this action needs to speed up and scale up to meet the Paris Agreement targets and achieve universal energy access by 2030 (Sustainable Development Goal 7). In particular, the Bank needs to phase out fossil fuels more quickly, and increase investment in renewable energy, with a focus on off-grid sources for the poorest populations living in remote communities.

The situation so far

In 2017 the World Bank President announced the phasing out of finance for exploration for oil and gas after 2019; this was an important step forward, but there were few details given at the Spring meetings last week about how this would be implemented. In the meantime, the Bank continues to invest in fossil fuels. [Read more…]

The tide is turning for the world’s waste crisis

1024px-Litter

The Government has woken up to the world’s waste crisis. Uncollected trash blights life chances in poor communities and chokes the oceans. Theresa May’s commitment today to help developing nations tackle pollution and reduce plastic waste through UK aid, as part of the Government’s 25-year environment plan, clears the way to a solution. We hope that concrete announcements will follow soon that commit the Government to spending 3 per cent of their aid budget to tackle this issue.  [Read more…]

Less Coal, Less Gas, More Hope – predictions on UK’s electricity

It’s very encouraging how fast Great Britain’s emissions from electricity have reduced over the last five years – 2017’s figures from the excellent MyGridGB show how far we’ve come.

This is mostly down to 4 things:

  • closing coal power stations
  • replacing a lot of coal with gas
  • replacing some coal with wind, and some with biomass, mainly wood
  • using a bit less electricity
pexels-photo-433308.jpeg

The future looks good for solar and wind power

Less coal, less gas

We’re doing well on using less coal, the single biggest step Britain needed to take on climate change. I think the government will keep their promise to shut coal power down completely by 2025. It’s been good to see climate minister Claire Perry championing phasing out coal internationally – and her promotion to attend cabinet in the reshuffle is encouraging too. [Read more…]

Widening the circle: the internationalisation of Scotland’s circular economy

Virtuous Circle-1035

Scotland is at the leading edge of the circular economy. Earlier this year, the Scottish Government was awarded a prestigious prize at the World Economic Forum for its work placing the circular economy at the core of Scotland’s economic strategy and manufacturing action plan. But so far discussion and action has been largely limited to domestic considerations. So where better to start the conversation on how to “widen the circle” than at the Scottish Parliament?  [Read more…]

We’re all in the same canoe – negotiating world climate directions at COP23

IMG-20171117-WA0010

Senior Campaigner Helen Heather writes from the close of the UN Climate Talks in Bonn.

As I entered the UN Climate Talks, I immediately noticed the vibrancy and welcome (‘Bula’) of the Fijians who have presided over the negotiations. Their presence during these negotiations has been hard to miss as they have elevated the voices of small islands, the Pacific nations and all vulnerable countries urgently needing climate action.

Indeed the symbol the Fiji delegation shared with everyone here is a Drua – a Fijian ocean-going canoe – with the message “we are all in the same canoe”. [Read more…]

I’m so awed by the USA

US freedom to pollute statue Bonn 2017

‘Freedom to pollute?’ A campaign stunt at UN climate talks in response to Trump’s stance on climate change

 

I’m sitting in the unofficial US pavilion at the COP23 climate talks in Bonn, thinking about the alternate dismal and hopeful prospects coming out of the USA, and hope’s winning.

Whoever you talk to here, they all feel depressed by Trump’s approach. His administration are leading in exactly the wrong direction on climate for people living in poverty; their rhetoric and plans will make things worse. They’ve announced the US will leave the UN climate talks and abandon their Paris Agreement promises. [Read more…]

3 opportunities for the new Secretary of State

manuele-sangalli-83864

The appointment of a new Secretary of State Penny Mordaunt MP to lead DFID presents an opportunity to step up the fight against poverty. Here are three things we would love to see Penny Mordaunt do during her time at DFID:  

1. Act on Aid

The UK have a proud history of delivering quality aid to those in need around the world. It is vital that the UK continues to honour this legacy by maintaining our commitment to spend 0.7% of the UK’s income on international development. It is important that the focus of this spending remains on providing life saving assistance and empowering people to raise themselves out of poverty. [Read more…]

5 things to watch out for at the Bonn climate talks

 

Government delegates from almost every country in the world have started global talks on climate change in Bonn, Germany. What do we need to see from governments this year?

1. Keep the spirit of Paris alive and stand by their promises, to safeguard people’s lives and livelihoods

Two years ago in Paris, world leaders promised to prevent irreversible climate change, urged on by faith leaders, civil society and businesses.  Now governments must turn that promise into reality.  They must keep the momentum going to ensure the Paris Agreement delivers on its full potential. [Read more…]

Story telling and policy making – which is the chicken and which is the egg? How social movements can help achieve the Paris Climate Agreement

typewriter_storytelling

Many people recognise that climate change has human causes and needs human interventions, but this knowledge hasn’t impacted their own habits and behaviours. Yet we know that achieving warming of less than 2C – the target of the Paris Agreement – requires lifestyle changes by us all. We also need policies to help us make the big changes in our lives and society. So which comes first? Policies or people?  [Read more…]

The world’s biggest waste dump (hint: it’s big, blue and you like going there)

I used to be a big fan of seafood: crabs, mussels, prawns you name it, I ate it. Then when this year Ghent University in Belgium found that seafood lovers could be eating up to 11,000 tiny pieces of plastic a year, I reluctantly decided to cut my consumption to the odd treat (what’s a couple of hundred bits of microplastics between friends). Consumers in better off nations like ours are rightly worried about the as yet unknown health impacts of ingesting plastic, but little or no attention has been paid to the impact on communities in the developing world.

The escalating crisis of marine litter (this ranges from microbeads to plastic bottles to boats) is the latest, dystopian symptom of a linear economy which takes, makes and throws away.  It turns out ‘away’ is often the oceans. Every year we produce 300 million pieces of plastic and 5 to 12.5 million pieces of it end up in the oceans.   [Read more…]